Sesame Chicken – China

This is a more authentically Chinese version of Sesame Chicken.  It is not breaded and super-sweet like that which you find in a typical Chinese restaurant in the United States.

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Garlic Chicken – China

This version of Garlic Chicken is a little similar to Sweet and Sour Chicken, except not too sweet, and certainly not too sour.

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Orange Beef – China

This recipe is so easy and comes together so quickly, why order out? To make it, you will need a pound of beef tenderloin or you could also use top sirloin. You’ll also need an orange, or at least part of one. Many American Chinese Restaurants use lots and lots of sugar, this recipe does not.
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Shanghai Stir-Fried Pork with Cabbage

pork and cabbage

The cuisine of Shanghai, also called Hu Cuisine, is closely related to two of it’s neighboring provinces, Jiangsu and  Zhejiang.  Together the cuisine is known as Benbang Cuisine.  I wonder if that is where we get “Bang Bang Chicken?” (it’s not – I was trying to be funny).  Two ingredients that can contribute to making a dish characteristic of the cuisine of Shanghai is the combo of soy sauce and sugar.  Cooking with alcohol is also popular, giving us drunken fish, drunken crabs, and drunken chicken.  In Shanghai “red cooking” is also popular.  That is a style of stewing which produces a red color to the food through the use of soy sauce and fermented bean paste or caramelized sugar.  Continue reading